Bullying: Everyone Counts in this Colorful Book

Books for Young Children #bullying #booksaboutbullying #teachkindness #inclusiveness #childlifespecialist #teacher #preschool #preschooler #booksforkids #booksforpreschoolers #teachthemyoung #standupforothers #earlyeducation

Child life specialists help children cope with life stressors, primarily injury and illness in the medical setting, but we are often in a position to help with related stressors outside of the hospital walls. Our rapport made with a family often lends itself to learning about stressors for a child and family within the walls of the school and home. If and when it is out of the scope of our services, we happily make the appropriate referral and sometimes partner with that discipline to help the family feel heard, supported and geared with some resources upon leaving the hospital. In these situations and as a mother of two, I've discovered the value children's books offer that explore and process challenges children face, such as emotional regulation, caregiver separation anxiety, or bullying. 

I'm in the process of compiling a comprehensive go to book resource list for children and families. In the process of looking for books that help reinforce emotional regulation strategies to my preschooler, I found a number of books that I am excited to share with parents and health care professionals working with young children.

Written by Kathryn Otoshi, "One" colorfully labels feelings and helps reinforce identifying numbers. It sends an important message about being kind, inclusive and standing up for someone if they are being bullied. For that reason, it's not only educational for preschoolers, but school-aged children as well. It's not a new book, published nearly 10 years ago, but one that still holds a valuable lesson for young children today. 

One
By Kathryn Otoshi

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Medical shape sorting game

Not all hospitalized children are bedridden. In fact, there are many children throughout the hospital who are able to move, with or without assistance, around their room and to other areas of the hospital. But at this time of the year, many of those who are able to play on the floor or at a desk cannot leave their rooms due to infection control policies.

 Even when a child has freedom to be a child and play within their designated treatment environment, how long can we really expect them to stay entertained confined in the same room playing with the same two or three toys.  That's where a little repurposing of your resources can come in handy.

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